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Posts Tagged ‘Rockefeller center’

Fifth After Midnight: THE JOURNEY TO ROCKEFELLER CENTER

In nyc photographer, NYC Today on December 31, 2014 at 3:20 pm

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We’ve been slowly strolling down Fifth Avenue towards the Rockefeller Center Christmas Tree.  Within 10 blocks, there is truly a vast array of architecture, culture and history.  People from all over the country work together to light up this space for pure enjoyment [and a little bit of commerce].  Some displays will become historic, some displays are historic.

No matter the origins or point of view, this is New York City-we are expected to push the envelope.

As I mentioned in the FENDI article, this series is a result of my curiosity to uncover the “behind the scenes” of the Rock Center Tree.  That chapter dear reader, will unfold at another time.

As the season comes to a close and the ball drops to begin the New Year, may you have a joyous celebration and a FABULOUS 2015!

Until next time.

Teresa51art

adventure is life, live it! ®

 

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The Tree Comes To Town (in the wee small hours of the morning…)

In NYC Today on November 7, 2014 at 6:46 am

The 2014 Rockefeller Christmas Tree made its way into the city well after midnight November 7, 2014.

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The NYPD escorted the 13-ton tree to Rockefeller Center arriving at 5th avenue around 2:00am, after a 155-mile journey from Danville, Pennsylvania.

The towering 85-foot Norway spruce donated by a central Pennsylvania family will remain on the flatbed of this 18 wheeler until daylight, when it is welcomed to
the final home on the plaza.

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Until next time.

Teresa51art

adventure is life, live it! ®

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Getting All the Facts

In historic places, NYC History, nyc photographer, NYC Today on January 16, 2014 at 11:24 pm

There is the expression: things are not as they appear.

That would apply to me as I made assumptions about an annual event in mid-town.  Let me explain.

During the month of November, I photographed the installation and decorating of the Rockefeller Center Christmas Tree.  On two of the four days shooting, I witnessed a man organizing branches. I thought these branches were removed from the tree on purpose and would be disposed.  (Similar to what we do with a home Christmas Tree.)  Well let me tell you why I was wrong with my assumption.

ImageThe tree was to be up through January 7, 2014. Since it took four weeks to decorate, I figured it would take a few days to remove and I wanted to complete the documentation of this holiday tradition.  To my surprise when I arrived early the morning of January 10, everything was gone. Camera in hand, I had nothing to photograph.

I walked down the stairs around the plaza by the ice rink and noticed a lovely cafe. This space had large glass windows overlooking the skaters. Living in the city for 8 years, I had never gotten this close to the ice.

On this morning it was oh so sweetly quiet.  And it was very cold. I decided a cup of coffee at this rink side cafe would be a perfect way to begin my Friday.

I found the street level elevator and took it down to the Rock Center Cafe.  The hostess sat me by the large windows overlooking the rink where 10 women were having a skating lesson.

ImageWhen my waitress came over, I began inquiring about the tree. I asked her when did it all get taken down? She told me the crew swoops in under the cloak of darkness and in one night removes everything. By sunrise it is all back to normal-every last light, tree branch, angel is taken away. It was all done by January 8.

We continued talking as I told her of my photographing the weeks of decorating. She had some wonderful fun facts about the process. In addition to stringing lights on the tree, the men and women on the scaffolding rebuild the shape of the tree. In transport, many branches are broken off; during the decorating they add these lost branches back in.

So the man I saw organizing branches was not disposing them, but actually sorting them for placement. Things were not as they appeared.

She also told me one other fact about the disposal of the tree I didn’t know. In addition to the wood being milled for Habitat for Humanity, and over 3 tons of mulch being generated for the BSA, the largest portion of the trunk is donated to the U.S. Equestrian Team as an obstacle jump.

And so even though I didn’t get to photograph the taking down of the tree this year, I am smarter about what is involved in this annual tradition.

After our conversation, I enjoyed a lovely cup of coffee with my bagel. Topping this experience off, my friend brought me a complimentary raspberry hot chocolate.

The morning power breakfast was beginning as the corporate suits trickled in. It was time for this photographer in work-boots and baseball-hat to head out.

Oh, how I love this town.

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Until next time.

Teresa51art

adventure is life, live it! ®

NYC Holiday Tradition

In historic places, NYC History, nyc photographer, NYC Today on December 24, 2013 at 2:26 am

My dad was in charge of Holiday decorating, more specifically the lights inside and out. It would be a production that would go on for days. Ladders of all heights would come out; staple guns and electrical tape too. Bulbs would have to be tested and retested for each strand of lights-my dad had some sort of voltage tester for this.

It was a project that he thoroughly enjoyed. It was a project that made my mother crazy. He would be out in the cold and she would be inside yelling at him through the windows. Good times.

Our lights growing up were blue.  (The old fashioned bulbs instead of the white twinkle lights of today).  And our tree had blue/green balls and garland with an angel at the top.

In 1931 at the site that is now Rockefeller Center, a tree was erected by the construction workers of that project in celebration of a paycheck. Everyone at that time was still feeling the impact of the Depression.

In current day New York I have seen the crowds swarm around the tree during the Holiday Season, year after year, without every knowing the history of this tradition.  This MovieShort tells that story.

This year I went to the site on 4 different occasions to document what it takes to prepare this tree for the lighting in December.  My first day of shooting was November 8, 2013 as they rolled the tree onto the plaza.

I’ve dedicated this MovieShort to my dad, as he would have appreciated the time and effort it takes to make something really special.

May your Holidays Sparkle!

Until next time.

Teresa51art

adventure is life, live it! ®

Finding Christmas

In NYC Today on December 18, 2012 at 3:41 am

For as long as I can remember, my family had a tradition of “finding” Christmas.  We would drive around the neighborhood seeking out the beautiful decorations of the season.

Living in New York, I now walk through my neighborhoods to discover beautiful, peaceful moments that get me closer to “finding” Christmas.

Whether you celebrate Christmas, Chanukah, Kwanzaa or a holiday I do not know, the joy in this season is the celebration of light and hope.

Throughout this time of year, I hope you too will “find” your Christmas.

This video was put together with images I have taken over the past few years walking from Central Park to the Upper West Side, down to Washington Square Park, up to Rockefeller Center and then on to Cape Cod.

Brooklyn based musician Derek Daisey provides this beautiful holiday song:  “Can You Help Me Find My Christmas?”  (available on iTunes.)

I wish everyone a very Happy Holiday Season!

Until next time.

Teresa51art

adventure is life, live it! ®